Uganda Day 9: 2019

This morning I was so excited for breakfast at Tembo, pancakes with golden syrup, but I had to settle for pancakes with lemon once we discovered an army of ants had got into the golden syrup. I needn’t have worried though, as when I got to Kafuro, Stephen had put on a morning spread of Tilapia, boiled eggs and tea. 


I wondered off as Stephen was organising lunch to watch the dancing. The children were practising for their afternoon performance during their break time and those not participating were watching, singing or clapping along. 


My lesson today was teaching P5. We discussed what a community is which they identified as a place and later came to understand that people are part of the community also. Their task was to draw their own community which was Kafuro and then begin to add more amenities they would like such as hospitals. I then asked the children to explain why they needed these places to make up the community. One group explained that they needed a school to gain knowledge and then get jobs – including being teachers which made myself and their class teacher very happy. Once they had drawn their communities, I showed them Liss on the board, drawing a rough map from memory. The map showed some similarities between the communities, such as the allotments and their farms to grow fruit and vegetables. Whilst I was drawing, it drew out some questions from the children about England, particularly about farming which I don’t have a vast amount of knowledge on, but I tried my best to answer! One girl asked me to sing which really threw me but the first song that came to mine was heads, shoulders, knees and toes which the children in Uganda (luckily) know already so it wasn’t a solo performance from myself!


At lunch time, the children return home for food as lunch is not provided at school like in England. However, some children remain at school if there is no food at home or if they have been able to bring sometime to eat at school. Some children were playing a game which looks similar in layout to King-Square but is actually a version of hopscotch. I had a few goes but I need to practice my balance if I want to improve. 


Stephen then took me for a walk around the farming fields behind the school. The primary crops are banana trees and coffee bean bush. I had never seen the process of a coffee plant before and what the pod looks like before it is dried which was very interesting. 


Lunch today was tilapia, rice, potatoes, chicken, cabbage and tomatoes which, as ever, was delicious. 


In the afternoon, the children gave a performance to the school, singing and dancing showing me their cultural dance. Yowasi was very encouraging and I joined in with the dance which I thought looked good until I saw the video back! Once the performance was over, it was time to head home for the day. 


CM Sp0orts were at another school so we drove to collect them. While the boys were showing the teachers how the gifted equipment could be used, some children performed songs for us – and some children even rapped!
In the car home, Joffrey’s playlist became 90s and 00s classics, which turned into karaoke singing in the car, even when we saw some elephants with a baby, the singing didn’t stop. I think the elephants enjoyed the Spice Girls 2 become 1! 


For the first time since arriving, we ate dinner at Tembo in the light as we made it home early enough which was nice to be able to see our food. Then we moved onto the Lodge. For the first time, we took Ashlea along and there was a tribal dance performance which doesn’t normally happen! It was amazing, Ashlea and I joined in for a while which was entertaining. Later on, no one was watching so for 20 (excruciatingly hot) minutes, Ashley, Luke, Paul, Nick and I joined in which was a highlight of my whole trip. 


Tomorrow is my last day at Kafuro and a very busy one!  

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